General Patton Facts

General George Patton
  • Date of birth: Nov 11, 1885
  • Date of death: Dec 21, 1945 (age 60 years)
  • Patton was involved in North Africa, Sicily, and the European Theater of Operations.
  • Patton participated in the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm in the first-ever modern pentathalon. He placed sixth out of 37
  • Patton was involved in First World War and helped pioneer the use of tanks during the Battle of Cambrai and later
  • One of greatest moments in the Second World War was at Bastogne, when Patton rapidly disengaged his army from fighting in another sector and moved it over 100 miles in 48 hours to relieve the siege at Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge.
  • Nickname Old Blood and Guts - He was well known for his uncompromising passionate speeches to his soldiers
  • Died in Car crash just after end of war.
  • He nearly got sacked for slapping and insulting a soldier suffering from battle fatigue.
His awards include:
  • Distinguished Service Cross (2)
  • Distinguished Service Medal (3)
  • Silver Star (2)
  • Legion of Merit
  • Bronze Star
  • Purple Heart
  • Order of the Bath
  • Order of the British Empire
  • He was seen as undiplomatic - often upsetting US allies such as Russia and Great Britain.
Perma Link | By: T Pettinger |

3 Comments:

Anonymous Brian said...

I knew General Paton during the war and General Motors

May 11, 2010 at 10:04 AM  
Anonymous James H said...

"Patton was involved in First World War and helped pioneer the use of tanks during the Battle of Cambrai and later."

Patton was almost certainly not at Cambrai in any capacity, and definitely not as a combatant. The U.S. Tank Corps was formed at the end of December 1917, a month after the battle, with Samuel Rockenbach in command. At the time of Cambrai the USA had no Tanks, and the only American troops involved were some railroad engineers who got caught in a German counter-attack. On the morning of the attack Patton's Diaries state that he was at the French Tank Training School at Champlieu, 75 miles away. Ten days later, after the offensive had stalled, he visited British Tank H.Q. at Albert, 30 miles from Cambrai. His diaries make no mention of his having observed or in any way participated in the battle.

He did, though, lead the Light Tank Brigade (equipped with French Rnault tanks) in action from September 1918 onwards.

February 23, 2011 at 6:28 PM  
Anonymous James H said...

"Patton was involved in First World War and helped pioneer the use of tanks during the Battle of Cambrai and later."

Patton was almost certainly not at Cambrai at all, and certainly not as a combatant. The U.S. Tank Corps was formed at the end of December 1917, a month after the battle, with Samuel Rockenbach in command. At the time of Cambrai the USA had no Tanks, and the only American troops involved were some railroad engineers who got caught in a German counter-attack. On the morning of the attack Patton's Diaries state that he was at the French Tank Training School at Champlieu, 75 miles away. Ten days later, after the offensive had stalled, he visited British Tank H.Q. at Albert, 30 miles from Cambrai. His diaries make no mention of his having observed or in any way participated in the battle.

He did, though, lead the Light Tank Brigade (equipped with French Rnault tanks) in action from September 1918 onwards.

February 23, 2011 at 6:30 PM  

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