Adam Smith Quotes

By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

It is the great multiplication of the productions of all the different arts, in consequence of the division of labour, which occasions, in a well-governed society, that universal opulence which extends itself to the lowest ranks of the people.

The Wealth Of Nations, Book I, Chapter I, p. 22, para. 10.

The importation of gold and silver is not the principal, much less the sole benefit which a nation derives from its foreign trade.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

To found a great empire for the sole purpose of raising up a people of customers, may at first appear a project fit only for a nation of shopkeepers. It is however, a project altogether unfit for a nation of shopkeepers; but extremely fit for a nation whose government is influenced by shopkeepers.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

Wherever there is great property, there is great inequality.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

"In general, if any branch of trade, or any division of labour, be advantageous to the public, the freer and more general the competition, it will always be the more so."

The Wealth Of Nations, Book II, Chapter II, p.329, para. 106.

The tolls for the maintenance of a high road, cannot with any safety be made the property of private persons.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

"It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our necessities but of their advantages."

The Wealth Of Nations, Book I, Chapter II, pp. 26-7, para 12.

Though the principles of the banking trade may appear somewhat abstruse, the practice is capable of being reduced to strict rules. To depart upon any occasion from these rules, in consequence of some flattering speculation of extraordinary gain, is almost always extremely dangerous, and frequently fatal to the banking company which attempts it.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

Nothing but the most exemplary morals can give dignity to a man of small fortune.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

"The subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible, in proportion to their respective abilities; that is, in proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state."

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)


* It is unjust that the whole of society should contribute towards an expence of which the benefit is confined to a part of the society.

- Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations (1776)

"This disposition to admire, and almost to worship , the rich and powerful, and to despise , or , at least neglect persons of poor and mean conditions, though necessary both to establish and to maintain the distinction of ranks and the order of society, is, at the same time, the great and most universal cause of the corruption of our moral sentiments."

- Adam Smith The Theory of Moral Sentiments

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1 Comments:

Anonymous ayumi said...

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ayumi
www.brfe.net

April 17, 2013 at 12:12 AM  

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